Blacksod Bay Assisted Emigration Sailings

Latest News From Descendants

Famines in Ireland Before 1845 and After 1852

by ionaddeirbhile

A Conference will be held at at Quinnipiac University, Hamden Co.  Connecticut,  June 12–15 2019

“Famines in Ireland Before 1845 and After 1852”

https://www.qu.edu/on-campus/institutes-centers/irelands-great-hunger-institute/famines-in-ireland.html

The schedule is also there for Saturday morning June 15th and this section will focus on James Hack Tuke and be held at Quinnipiac University’s York Hill Campus. There is also an exhibition titled, James Hack Tuke: Quaker, Philanthropist and Friend to Irelands Poor. The exhibition will be located in the Arnold Bernhard Library, (Quinnipiac University) and run until September 2019.

Unfortunately we are unable to make it this time. Representatives of Ionad Deirbhile Heritage Centre, attended a Conference there in 2014 and received a great welcome. It is a good opportunity to meet up with other descendants, who share a common bond and who may be there.

Ned, Bridget (Deane) Lavelle, Inver, Knocknalower to Pennsylvania. SS Nestorian

by ionaddeirbhile

Highlighting a comment received for the post: Ned, Bridget (Deane) Lavelle, Inver, Knocknalower. The Lavelle Family were Ned, and Bridget with their children Bridget 18, Anthony 16, Ned 14, Martin 12, Sabina 8, Peter 7 and Mary 6

Comment :  Sabina (Binnia) Lavalle Kenney is my grandmother! She passed in June 1957 before I was born. You can tour the mine that they worked in Ashland Pa. Its both fascinating and humbling experience going down in the mine. My family will be visiting County Mayo this August. Needless to say I am very excited to discover my personnel connection and looking forward to visiting the center

William, Mary (Mulrooney) Hopkins, Atticonaun, Belmullet to Wolfe Island

by ionaddeirbhile

In May 1883 William Hopkins and his wife Mary, along with their family Mary 18, James 16, Thomas 13 and John 3 emigrated from the townland of Attycunnane, Belmullet, County Mayo.  The Hopkins family along with many others, boarded SS Manitoban at Blacksod Bay. When the anchor was raised and SS Manitoban left the Bay, 247 extra Passengers were onboard headed for the Port of Quebec.

Descendant, Michael Potts has carried out extensive research into his family history. William, Mary and family settled on Wolfe Island, Lake Ontario near the entrance to the St Lawrence River.  By 1891 the family were still living on Wolfe Island as the Census of Canada shows. The 1900 United States Federal Census sees the Hopkins family eventually settled in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.

Michael and Marjorie Potts from Centreville, Virginia, also Brian Veasey of Somerdale, New Jersey recently visited Ionad Deirbhile Heritage Centre and the Blacksod Memorial Garden. Michael’s Great Grandfather Thomas Hopkins was age 13, when he boarded SS Manitoban with his parents and siblings at Blacksod Bay,  Brian is also a descendant of Thomas Hopkins and his Veasey family was from Achill

Patrick, Catherine (Walsh) McManmon Family, Glencastle to Lowell, Massachusetts. SS Nestorian

by ionaddeirbhile

The above photograph is of Patrick and Catherine (Walsh) McManmon, who with their family James 17, Francis 9, Peter 7 and Michael 5 emigrated from Bunahouna, near Glencastle, Belmullet, County Mayo. Their destination was stated as Lowell, Massachusetts. The McManmon family settled in Lowell, as did other relatives who had travelled out before them.

Many thanks to Peter McManmon for kindly sending in a photograph of his Great Grandparents Patrick and Catherine. The family are documented as McManaman on the Ship’s manifest. Peter is a Grandson of James who was age 17 on the sailing of SS Nestorian.

Great-Granddaughter of Bridget Tougher, Tip, Belmullet, travels from Toronto, Canada.

by ionaddeirbhile

Kathleen at Ionad Deirbhile Heritage Centre, Eachléim, Blacksod

Frank and Sarah (McKeon) Tougher with their family Anthony 16, Bridget 14, Francis 10, James 8, Michael 6 and Ellen 3 lived in Tip, Aughalasheen on the Mullet Peninsula.

The Tougher family like many others, left Blacksod Bay onboard the “Allan Line” steamship SS Scandinavian, on the 22nd April 1883 for the port of Quebec. Two Hundred and fifty nine passengers boarded that day at Blacksod. Families of Erris, Achill and Newport West, all journeyed together. The ship’s manifest stated, “No destinations given, all Tuke’s passengers” On the 3rd of May the SS Scandinavian arrived at Quebec

The 1891 Census of Canada, shows Sarah, along with sons Frank, Michael and daughter Ellen living at Muskoka and Parry Sound, Ontario. Bridget married John Mahon and eventually settled in Sudbury, Ontario.

Kathleen Howes, a great granddaughter of Bridget Tougher (age 14 on the sailing), travelled from Toronto back to her family roots on the Mullet Peninsula.

As with many Toughers arriving in the US and Canada, the name Tougher became Tucker.

Patrick, Catherine (Walsh) McManmon Family, Glencastle to Lowell, Massachusetts

by ionaddeirbhile

Patrick and Catherine (Walsh) McManmon with their family James 17, Francis 9, Peter 7 and Michael 5 emigrated from Bunahouna, near Glencastle, Belmullet, County Mayo, Ireland. On the 30th March 1883, they stood on the shores of Barnagh Island, along with other local  families.  All were waiting, to be rowed out to another ship, which then ran up alongside the SS Nestorian anchored in the deeper waters of Blacksod Bay. The McManmon family were travelling to Boston, with an onward destination stated as Lowell, Massachusetts, where other family members had previously settled. Patrick Catherine and family also made their home in Lowell, Middlesex County, Massachusetts. The surname McManmon, appears as McManaman, on the ship’s manifest.

Pictured above is Katherine May, a Granddaughter of John McManmon born in Glencastle and Jeannie Coggins Lockinger, Granddaughter of John’s sister Agnes, born in the United States. Katherine and Jeannie travelled from Massachusettes and Virginia respectively.

Many thanks, to Peter McManmon for leaving a comment on the site in 2017. “My great grandfather, Patrick James McManmon left Blacksod Bay on the Nestorian in 1883 for Boston. He ended up staying in Massachusetts”

Photographs, by kind permission of Katherine May.

Message from Peter McManmon. The photo of the couple is of my grandparents James j and Anne L Colins McManmon he was the eldest son of Patrick J McManmon and the one furthest to the left in the group photo

Blacksod Bay Emigration at Ionad Deirbhile Heritage Centre, is privileged to see so many descendants, travelling great distances back to the homeplace of their ancestors. Our  www.blacksodbayemigration.ie and  https://blacksodbayemigration.wordpress.com/ descendants’ site, were brought about by transcribing manifests and a great deal of continued Local History research, to form a focal point for descendants of the families of our communities.

Ionad Deirbhile Heritage Centre, Eachléim, Blacksod, County Mayo…Rosemarie    

Dominick, Bridget (Meenahan) Barrett Family, Mullet Peninsula to Delaware, Ohio.

by ionaddeirbhile

From the townland of Barhauve, near Belmullet, Dominick, Bridget and their young family, Michael age eight, Honor seven and Bridget six months, headed for Elly Bay to board the SS Canadian on April 13 1884. Bridget was formerly Bridget Meenahan from Gortmellia.  The couple, married in Aughoose Church, just a few miles away from Gortmellia and went on to live in Barhauve.

With the Atlantic Ocean crossed, the Canadian arrived in Boston, later that month on April 24. After disembarking,  the Barrett family travelled onwards to their destination of Delaware, Ohio. Dominick worked for the railroad, as did Bridget’s cousins. The Meenahan cousins had emigrated to Delaware some years earlier. On the 1900 United States Census, the Barretts were still living in Delaware, Ohio.

A journey from Mesa, Arizona, U.S.A. led Linda Cox back to the Mullet Peninsula, County Mayo. Linda’s Grandmother was Bridget (Bridgie) Barrett, the youngest child, aged only six months, born in Barhauve, on the ‘Mullet Peninsula’ in 1883. Linda and husband Charles are pictured above, at Ionad Deirbhile Heritage Centre, Aughleam, Blacksod

Many variations of the surname Meenahan are seen on records in the U.S. and Canada, including Meenaghan, Moynihan and Minahan

by ionaddeirbhile

Ireland’s Great Hunger Institute at Quinnipiac University invites you to their biennial Conference, 12-15 June 2019.

Famines in Ireland before 1845 and after 1852

The Great Hunger of 1845 to 1852 has cast a long shadow over the subsequent history of Ireland and its diaspora. Since 1995, there has been a renewed interest in studying this event, by scholars, students, archeologists, artists, musicians, folklorists etc.  This interest shows no sign of abating. New research, methodologies and approaches have greatly added to our understanding of the causes, impact and legacies of this tragedy.

The focus on the Great Hunger has overshadowed other periods of famine and food shortages in Ireland and their influences on a society in which poverty, hunger, emigration and even death, were part of the life-cycle and not unique to the 1840s.

‘Famines before 1845 and after 1852’ will explore the impact of these intermittent crises on the people of Ireland. Scholars, students and researchers of all disciplines are welcome to submit a proposal.

Confirmed keynote speakers, Dr. Ciarán Reilly, of Maynooth University, will speak about the famine of 1831, and Dr. Gerard Moran, Social Science Research Centre, NUI Galway, will speak about ‘The Forgotten Famine of 1879-1882’.

Please send abstracts of up to 350 words to Christine.kinealy@qu.edu   by 15 January 2019.

All other queries, direct to: ighi@quinnipiac.edu

Quinnipiac University is located in Hamden, near to the beautiful Sleeping Giant Mountain, its name, like Quinnipiac, being derived from native American folklore.  The programme will include visits to the exhibition, ‘James Hack Tuke: Quaker philanthropist and friend to Ireland’s poor’, to Ireland’s Great Hunger Museum, the Knights of Columbus Museum, Yale University and downtown New Haven.

Convenors: Professor Christine Kinealy, Quinnipiac University and Dr Jason King, Irish Heritage Trust. In partnership with the Irish Heritage Trust and the National Famine Museum at Strokestown.

New publication by Gerard Moran

by ionaddeirbhile

Fleeing from famine in Connemara: James Hack Tuke and his assisted emigration scheme in the 1880s
http://www.fourcourtspress.ie/books/2018/fleeing-from-famine-in-connemara/

Gerard Moran has published extensively on 19th century Ireland, including Sending out Ireland’s Poor: assisted emigration to North America in the nineteenth century (Dublin, 2004).

Families from the Connemara area of County Galway, Ireland, were also assisted by the Tuke Emigration Scheme in the early 1800s. The Connemara families mainly from Clifden and Oughterard regions boarded at Galway Bay.

Peter, Rose (Barrett) McAndrew Family, Glencastle, County Mayo to Erin Prairie, Wisconsin

by ionaddeirbhile

On Friday the 11th of May 1883 Peter and Rose (Barrett) McAndrew with their family Anthony, Anne, John, Henry (Harry), Helen, Cath, twins Rose and Bridget, and Mary emigrated from their home in Glencastle. The McAndrew family (including another Rose McAndrew, also travelling with them) left the Barony of Erris, directly from Blacksod Bay onboard SS Prussian. Peter, Rose and family settled in St Croix County, Wisconsin and farmed in Erin Prairie.

Cath McAndrew was age six when she left Glencastle with her parents and siblings, her granddaughter Maria Meade visited the McAndrew family homestead in 2011.

“I thought people would like to know about this song. My Cousins shared the song on a cassette with me initially when I was there. They knew the song. Apparently many in Belmullet and surrounding areas know the song.
The photo is the owner of McDonnell Pub in Belmullet, singing the song to us one night in the pub, accompanied by the guitar player who was entertaining.
It was a life-changing moment. Perhaps you could post it on the site”