Blacksod Bay Assisted Emigration Sailings

Latest News From Descendants

Patrick, Catherine (Walsh) McManmon Family, Glencastle to Lowell, Massachusetts

by ionaddeirbhile

Patrick and Catherine (Walsh) McManmon with their family James 17, Francis 9, Peter 7 and Michael 5 emigrated from Bunahouna, near Glencastle, Belmullet, County Mayo, Ireland. On the 30th March 1883, they stood on the shores of Barnagh Island, along with other local  families.  All were waiting, to be rowed out to another ship, which then ran up alongside the SS Nestorian anchored in the deeper waters of Blacksod Bay. The McManmon family were travelling to Boston, with an onward destination stated as Lowell, Massachusetts, where other family members had previously settled. Patrick Catherine and family also made their home in Lowell, Middlesex County, Massachusetts. The surname McManmon, appears as McManaman, on the ship’s manifest.

Pictured above is Katherine May, a Granddaughter of John McManmon born in Glencastle and Jeannie Coggins Lockinger, Granddaughter of John’s sister Agnes, born in the United States. Katherine and Jeannie travelled from Massachusettes and Virginia respectively.

Many thanks, to Peter McManmon for leaving a comment on the site in 2017. “My great grandfather, Patrick James McManmon left Blacksod Bay on the Nestorian in 1883 for Boston. He ended up staying in Massachusetts”

Photographs, by kind permission of Katherine May.

Message from Peter McManmon. The photo of the couple is of my grandparents James j and Anne L Colins McManmon he was the eldest son of Patrick J McManmon and the one furthest to the left in the group photo

Blacksod Bay Emigration at Ionad Deirbhile Heritage Centre, is privileged to see so many descendants, travelling great distances back to the homeplace of their ancestors. Our  www.blacksodbayemigration.ie and  https://blacksodbayemigration.wordpress.com/ descendants’ site, were brought about by transcribing manifests and a great deal of continued Local History research, to form a focal point for descendants of the families of our communities.

Ionad Deirbhile Heritage Centre, Eachléim, Blacksod, County Mayo…Rosemarie    

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Dominick, Bridget (Meenahan) Barrett Family, Mullet Peninsula to Delaware, Ohio.

by ionaddeirbhile

From the townland of Barhauve, near Belmullet, Dominick, Bridget and their young family, Michael age eight, Honor seven and Bridget six months, headed for Elly Bay to board the SS Canadian on April 13 1884. Bridget was formerly Bridget Meenahan from Gortmellia.  The couple, married in Aughoose Church, just a few miles away from Gortmellia and went on to live in Barhauve.

With the Atlantic Ocean crossed, the Canadian arrived in Boston, later that month on April 24. After disembarking,  the Barrett family travelled onwards to their destination of Delaware, Ohio. Dominick worked for the railroad, as did Bridget’s cousins. The Meenahan cousins had emigrated to Delaware some years earlier. On the 1900 United States Census, the Barretts were still living in Delaware, Ohio.

A journey from Mesa, Arizona, U.S.A. led Linda Cox back to the Mullet Peninsula, County Mayo. Linda’s Grandmother was Bridget (Bridgie) Barrett, the youngest child, aged only six months, born in Barhauve, on the ‘Mullet Peninsula’ in 1883. Linda and husband Charles are pictured above, at Ionad Deirbhile Heritage Centre, Aughleam, Blacksod

Many variations of the surname Meenahan are seen on records in the U.S. and Canada, including Meenaghan, Moynihan and Minahan

by ionaddeirbhile

Ireland’s Great Hunger Institute at Quinnipiac University invites you to their biennial Conference, 12-15 June 2019.

Famines in Ireland before 1845 and after 1852

The Great Hunger of 1845 to 1852 has cast a long shadow over the subsequent history of Ireland and its diaspora. Since 1995, there has been a renewed interest in studying this event, by scholars, students, archeologists, artists, musicians, folklorists etc.  This interest shows no sign of abating. New research, methodologies and approaches have greatly added to our understanding of the causes, impact and legacies of this tragedy.

The focus on the Great Hunger has overshadowed other periods of famine and food shortages in Ireland and their influences on a society in which poverty, hunger, emigration and even death, were part of the life-cycle and not unique to the 1840s.

‘Famines before 1845 and after 1852’ will explore the impact of these intermittent crises on the people of Ireland. Scholars, students and researchers of all disciplines are welcome to submit a proposal.

Confirmed keynote speakers, Dr. Ciarán Reilly, of Maynooth University, will speak about the famine of 1831, and Dr. Gerard Moran, Social Science Research Centre, NUI Galway, will speak about ‘The Forgotten Famine of 1879-1882’.

Please send abstracts of up to 350 words to Christine.kinealy@qu.edu   by 15 January 2019.

All other queries, direct to: ighi@quinnipiac.edu

Quinnipiac University is located in Hamden, near to the beautiful Sleeping Giant Mountain, its name, like Quinnipiac, being derived from native American folklore.  The programme will include visits to the exhibition, ‘James Hack Tuke: Quaker philanthropist and friend to Ireland’s poor’, to Ireland’s Great Hunger Museum, the Knights of Columbus Museum, Yale University and downtown New Haven.

Convenors: Professor Christine Kinealy, Quinnipiac University and Dr Jason King, Irish Heritage Trust. In partnership with the Irish Heritage Trust and the National Famine Museum at Strokestown.

New publication by Gerard Moran

by ionaddeirbhile

Fleeing from famine in Connemara: James Hack Tuke and his assisted emigration scheme in the 1880s
http://www.fourcourtspress.ie/books/2018/fleeing-from-famine-in-connemara/

Gerard Moran has published extensively on 19th century Ireland, including Sending out Ireland’s Poor: assisted emigration to North America in the nineteenth century (Dublin, 2004).

Families from the Connemara area of County Galway, Ireland, were also assisted by the Tuke Emigration Scheme in the early 1800s. The Connemara families mainly from Clifden and Oughterard regions boarded at Galway Bay.

Peter, Rose (Barrett) McAndrew Family, Glencastle, County Mayo to Erin Prairie, Wisconsin

by ionaddeirbhile

On Friday the 11th of May 1883 Peter and Rose (Barrett) McAndrew with their family Anthony, Anne, John, Henry (Harry), Helen, Cath, twins Rose and Bridget, and Mary emigrated from their home in Glencastle. The McAndrew family (including another Rose McAndrew, also travelling with them) left the Barony of Erris, directly from Blacksod Bay onboard SS Prussian. Peter, Rose and family settled in St Croix County, Wisconsin and farmed in Erin Prairie.

Cath McAndrew was age six when she left Glencastle with her parents and siblings, her granddaughter Maria Meade visited the McAndrew family homestead in 2011.

“I thought people would like to know about this song. My Cousins shared the song on a cassette with me initially when I was there. They knew the song. Apparently many in Belmullet and surrounding areas know the song.
The photo is the owner of McDonnell Pub in Belmullet, singing the song to us one night in the pub, accompanied by the guitar player who was entertaining.
It was a life-changing moment. Perhaps you could post it on the site”

Dominick, Bridget (Meenahan) Barrett Family, Barhauve, Belmullet to Delaware, Ohio

by ionaddeirbhile

Andrew and family at Blacksod Memorial Garden. 

Dominick Barrett with his wife Bridget and children Michael 9, Honor 7 and Bridget age six months, lived in the townland of Barhauve, near Belmullet. Bridget was formerly Bridget Meenahan from Gortmellia. The Barrett family emigrated on the SS Canadian 13th April 1884, the first of four sailings that departed in 1884 directly from Blacksod Bay. The destination stated on the ship’s manifest was to Delaware, Ohio. After they arrived at the Port of Boston on the 24th April, the family continued on their life changing journey. On the 1900 United States Census, the Barretts were still living in Delaware, Ohio.

Andrew Paul and family travelled from Washington D.C. back to the Mullet Peninsula, the homeplace of his ancestors. Bridget (Bridgie) Barrett, age just six months, onboard the sailing of SS Canadian, was Andrew’s Great Grandmother.

Andrew at Ionad Deirbhile Heritage Centre Eachléim, Blacksod.

The ‘Mullet Peninsula’ is the Kilmore Erris, Church Parish, Diocese of Killala. ‘Mullet Peninsula’ Civil Records come under the Belmullet District.

Anthony, Margaret (Prendergast) Barrett Family, Tip, Aughalasheen and Shraigh, Bunnahowen. SS Nestorian

by ionaddeirbhile

Anthony and Margaret (Prendergast) Barrett were originally from the townland of Tip, on the Mullet Peninsula, where their elder children were born.
At the time of emigrating, Anthony and Margaret with their family, John 20, Rose 16, Bridget 14, Edward 9, Michael 7 and Honor 5, were living in Shraigh, Bunnahowen. The Barrett family were in familiar company, when they boarded the SS Nestorian on 30th March 1883 at Blacksod Bay.

The next family on the manifest was Mary Lally, along with children Pat 10, John 7, Cath 4 and William 8 months. Mary’s husband Patrick had travelled out, before the rest of the family. They settled in Lackawanna County, Pennsylvania, in Jessup, then on to Winton Borough. Mary (Barrett) Lally was Anthony and Margaret’s daughter.
William Barrett, an elder son of Anthony and Margaret, born in Tip, had emigrated at an earlier date to Pennsylvania.
Members of the Barrett and Lally families were engaged in mining, and lived in the Jessup and Winton Boroughs of Lackawanna County.

Cousins Katie, Lucy, Pattie, Deanie, Mary, Melissa and Katie’s daughter Michaela, Edward Barrett’s Great granddaughters and great,great, granddaughter, journeyed back to Blacksod Bay. Edward was age nine, when he boarded the Nestorian at Blacksod Bay, with his parents and siblings. The Barrett descendants travelled from Detroit, Michigan, U.S.A.

On their visit to Ionad Deirbhile Heritage Centre, Anthony and Margaret’s descendants noticed a letter written by Richard Le Maire, a descendant of Ned Barrett from Bunawillan. Ned and family lived in the same area, boarded the same sailing and both families were headed for Pennsylvania. Ned’s family were miners in Sugar Notch Borough, Luzerne, County.

Richard’s Letter: 2013

Many thanks to you and the staff at the Heritage Centre. The results of the research you are carrying on are invaluable and a gift to those of us searching for our connection with Erin, our ancestors’ native land. Be reminded that most never returned “home”, never saw their own again except in their hearts and memories, but never forgot. They instilled this love in generations of their progeny over 40 million strong in America today.
Again, thank you so much for finding me on the internet. I am 82 now and feel a sense of closure with this side of my family. I was practically brought up by my Mayo grandparents, Michael Dent, Ned Barrett’s grandson of Bunnawillan, and Anne Barrett, Harry, of Doolough. I spent so much time with them as a child and had the sense to ask questions even to memorizing” The Wren, The Wren” in Irish.
I am indebted to all at the Heritage Centre. Thanks for seeing to it that the poor souls who left part of their lives behind will be remembered by generations to come.

Katie left a message on this site: To Richard Le Maire,
Your letter exactly describes our feelings. Several of the Anthony Barrett/ Margaret Prendergast descendants visited Ireland and found this Memorial on our journey. I will never forget Rosemarie and her kindness or Philomena (Phil). Their warmness toward us and their enthusiasm about our family was overwhelming.
Our ancestors came over on the S.S. Nestorian. In fact, I’m wondering the connection between our Anthony Barrett and your Ned Barrett. Perhaps they were brothers?? Anthony was born in 1825 and from what I’ve seen, I believe Ned was born in 1823.
Thank you again for your kind words in your letter. We read it aloud at our meeting with Rosemarie and all felt it very much captured our feelings.
With gratitude,
Katherine (Katie)…great great granddaughter of Anthony Barrett (spelled Barratt on the passenger list) and Margaret (Prendergast). Great granddaughter of Edward Barrett, also on that list, traveling with his parents to Pennsylvania.

Anthony and Margaret Barrett’s descendants in Blacksod (An Fód Dubh)

Honora (Reilly) Heveran Family, Fallmore, Blacksod to Youngstown, Ohio. SS Nestorian

by ionaddeirbhile

Cath Heveran, daughter of Patrick Heveran and Honor (Reilly) Heveran , was born in Fallmore, Blacksod on the 9th November 1873. At he age of ten, Cath, along with her siblings Ellis, Bridget, Annie, Pat and widowed mother Honor, emigrated from their home on the Mullet Peninsula.

On the 30th March 1883 the Heveran Family boarded SS Nestorian for the port of Boston, with an onward destination stated as Ohio. When the ship docked at Boston, Cath and family journeyed onwards to Youngstown, Ohio, where they settled.

On the day Cath emigrated, an Irish Times Report  mentions … the weather in the early part of the morning was cold, with several showers of rain and sleet falling, later however the day cleared up and the sun shone warmly from a blue sky, here and there relieved with white masses of clouds……  while all around were visible the lofty rugged mountains of Mayo, their snow-clad heights glistening in the sunlight.

Maryanne Dunmire travelled from Detroit, Michigan, to the townland of  Fallmore, to see with her own eyes, the home of her Reilly / Heveran ancestors. Where Maryanne’s Grandmother Cath and siblings, must surely have played in the fields as children and gone back to the nearby beach. Maryanne also visited St. Deirbhile’s Well in the same townland.  Fortunately the sun also shone from a blue sky that day!

Fallmore, Blacksod on the Southern tip of the Mullet Peninsula, looking over to Achill Island. Photo C Geraghty

Maryanne Dunmire, Grandaughter of Cath Heveran, visiting Ionad Deirbhile Heritage Centre, Eachléim (photo of Cath, courtesy of Diann Fahey, Grandaughter of Cath’s sister Annie)

 

 

 

 

Patrick, Mary (Everett, Everard) Lavelle Family, Devlane, Clogher, Mullet Peninsula. SS Canadian 1883 Quebec

by ionaddeirbhile

Patrick and Mary Lavelle with their family, Edward 19, Bridget 17, Mary 14, Nancy 11, James 9, Thomas 5 and Cath age 1, emigrated from the small coastal townland, of Devlane, Clogher, on the Mullet Peninsula, County Mayo.
The Lavelle family boarded the SS Canadian, at Blacksod Bay on the 19th May 1883.  The Ocean Steamer was headed for Quebec and arrived on the 1st of June. As with many of the families, no destination was stated on the manifest.

Anne Oldaker and daughter Katie, travelled from Allegheny County, Pennsylvania, back to Devlane. Anne is a Granddaughter, of James Lavelle aged nine, when he left Erris. James eventually settled in Pennsylvania. Anne and Katie are pictured above at Ionad Deirbhile Heritage Centre, Eachléim, Blacksod, home of the Blacksod Bay Emigration Exhibition and Research.

Thanks to Phil McIntyre always so helpful, also Pap and Catherine Murphy for an informative visit to Turas Siar Heritage Centre, in nearby Cartron.

Anne and Katie, by pure coincidence, also left the Mullet Peninsula on the 19th May (2018) after re-establishing a bond, with the home of their Lavelle family ancestors.

Versions of the surname, Everett have also been recorded as Everard, Everitt and Hereford. Blacksod Bay Emigration Research, finds families of Erris and Achill who boarded the same sailing at Blacksod, settled, in the Provinces of Manitoba and Ontario, also Pennsylvania, Cleveland Ohio, Bellaire Ohio and Holyoke, Massachusetts.

Ned, Bridget (Deane) Lavelle, Inver, Knocknalower to Pennsylvania. SS Nestorian

by ionaddeirbhile

“The long procession wended its way seawards, some walking, and bending beneath the weight of huge bundles containing the entire property of the family, while others rode slowly forward in carts, the father leading the horse, and the mother and children and baggage occupying the vehicle. For hours this scene continued with few intervals”
Extract from the “Irish Times” entitled “Departure of the first batch of Emigrants” published Saturday March 31 1883.

Ned and Bridget (Deane) Lavelle with their family Bridget 18, Anthony 16, Ned 14, Martin 12, Sabina 8, Peter 7 and Mary 6, were part of this life changing moment, in our local history. (as were other families we now remember) The Lavelle family travelled from their home, in the townland of Inver, Knocknalower, County Mayo, to board the SS Nestorian Friday, 30th March 1883 at Blacksod Bay.
On the 1900 US Federal Census members of the Lavelle family are living in Conyngham, Columbia County, Pennsylvania. As with many families who settled in Pennsylvania, members of the family were miners. Back breaking work, doing whatever they could, to give their families a better future.
John Eyre, is a great Grandson of Peter Lavelle who was just seven, when he left Inver, with his parents and siblings.  John and wife Lucyann, travelled from North Carolina, USA, back to his family roots in Inver and also visited Ionad Deirbhile Heritage Centre, Eachleim, Blacksod.

Groups of families leaving from Blacksod Bay, often settled in the same areas, engaged in the same employment. On one page alone, of the 1900 US Federal Census for Conyngham, Columbia County, are three of our Mullet Peninsula families. Anthony, Mary Gaughan and family from Inishglora Island (SS Scandinavian 1883), Bridget Hogan and family, who journeyed from Inishkea Island (SS Canadian 1884), also Bryan, Mary Mooney and family from Ardmore, Binghamstown (SS Prussian 1884)