by ionaddeirbhile

Ireland’s Great Hunger Institute at Quinnipiac University invites you to their biennial Conference, 12-15 June 2019.

Famines in Ireland before 1845 and after 1852

The Great Hunger of 1845 to 1852 has cast a long shadow over the subsequent history of Ireland and its diaspora. Since 1995, there has been a renewed interest in studying this event, by scholars, students, archeologists, artists, musicians, folklorists etc.  This interest shows no sign of abating. New research, methodologies and approaches have greatly added to our understanding of the causes, impact and legacies of this tragedy.

The focus on the Great Hunger has overshadowed other periods of famine and food shortages in Ireland and their influences on a society in which poverty, hunger, emigration and even death, were part of the life-cycle and not unique to the 1840s.

‘Famines before 1845 and after 1852’ will explore the impact of these intermittent crises on the people of Ireland. Scholars, students and researchers of all disciplines are welcome to submit a proposal.

Confirmed keynote speakers, Dr. Ciarán Reilly, of Maynooth University, will speak about the famine of 1831, and Dr. Gerard Moran, Social Science Research Centre, NUI Galway, will speak about ‘The Forgotten Famine of 1879-1882’.

Please send abstracts of up to 350 words to Christine.kinealy@qu.edu   by 15 January 2019.

All other queries, direct to: ighi@quinnipiac.edu

Quinnipiac University is located in Hamden, near to the beautiful Sleeping Giant Mountain, its name, like Quinnipiac, being derived from native American folklore.  The programme will include visits to the exhibition, ‘James Hack Tuke: Quaker philanthropist and friend to Ireland’s poor’, to Ireland’s Great Hunger Museum, the Knights of Columbus Museum, Yale University and downtown New Haven.

Convenors: Professor Christine Kinealy, Quinnipiac University and Dr Jason King, Irish Heritage Trust. In partnership with the Irish Heritage Trust and the National Famine Museum at Strokestown.

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